Visual Brand Language

Consistent visual brand language across a range of products or services is valuable because it gives users a sense that discreet products exist within a system. In this case, the brand language of Corvette is transposed to a spray bottle.  The first stage of the project was a team effort at brand research. We worked together to separate the signature elements from the momentary ones. We then took our style guide and applied it to a product individually. I worked on a spray bottle.

The zigzag line indicates the change in posture.

The zigzag line indicates the change in posture.

During this project I experienced three breakthroughs. First, I disassembled an existing spray bottle and sketched orthographic views of the necessary mechanical bits. I used this as an underlay while sketching to keep details within feasible constraints. Second, while sketching I realized that the posture of the bottle was what made it feel like Corvette or not. My earlier sketches had too much weight on the heel. I needed more weight on the forefoot. Third, was using Chavant clay as well as SolidWorks. If I was an author, Chavant would be my typewriter and SolidWorks would be my letterpress.

SolidWorks extrusions

SolidWorks extrusions

Chavant modeling

Chavant modeling

The final model pushed the boundaries of form language we are accustomed to in stores, but remained expressive of the Corvette brand language. This bottle feels appropriate in the hands of my persona, the person who cleans and details cars at the Chevrolet dealership.

The hip profile differentiate the Corvette from other sports cars. A crisp chamfer references the sharp crease language on the hood.

The hip profile differentiate the Corvette from other sports cars. A crisp chamfer references the sharp crease language on the hood.

The shoulder of the car relates to the head of the spray bottle.

The shoulder of the car relates to the head of the spray bottle.